Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: What is a Function Chain (video)

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: What is a Function Chain (video)

Function Chain? What is a Function Chain? And how that works inside the Data Mapper?

When we use more than one cascading function to perform a transformation rule, we call it a Function Chain, or a chain of functions that are going to be executed in order. This way, we can apply more complex mapping rules inside the Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper. By the way, we had the same concept inside BizTalk Server Maps and Logic App Consumption Map (that is, the BizTalk Server Maps extracted and isolated)

The picture below shows us a Function Chain inside the Data Mapper. In this case, we are calculating national and international calls based on the phone number:

In this video, we will learn t what a Function Chain is inside the Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper and how it works.

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it useful and want to help me write more content, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira

Data Mapper Tricks and Tips: Workaround to organize your functions (video)

Data Mapper Tricks and Tips: Workaround to organize your functions (video)

Time to start another series of blog posts about Logic Apps: Data Mapper Tricks and Tips! Where I will address simple tips and tricks, we can apply to our Data Mapper to be more productive, solve a problem, or help bypass some limitations or constraints.

For this first blog post, I decided to explain a simple workaround that we can use today to help us organize our maps better in order for them to be more readable. Unfortunately, at the moment, I’m writing this post when we add a Function to our map we cannot drag and drop the function into another position in the data mapper area. That means that often when we are applying the mapping rules, they will get overlap as you see in the picture below:

In this case, the To Integer Function is on top of the Concat function, which makes it difficult to read and work inside the Data Mapper. In this sort video, we will see a very useful trick and Tip to organize our functions inside the Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper – it may not work in all scenarios but is the best option we have for now.

P.S: Microsoft is working on adding this drag and drop capability, so in the future, we will be able to move the shapes, aka functions, in the mapping area.

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it helpful and want to help me write more content, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: What is a function?

Function category
Category description
Functions in category Collection

Used to perform a variety of operations over collections, such as cumulative sum, short, or get distinct values.

Average, Count, Direct Access, Distinct Values, Filter, Index, Join, Maximum, Minimum, Reverse, Sort, Sub Sequence, Sum Conversion

Used to convert values to specific times.

To DateTime, To integer, To number, To string Date and TimeUsed to perform a variety of operations over Dates, such as retrieving the current date and time or adding dates. Add days, Add DayTime to Date, Add DayTime to DateTime, Add DayTime to Time, Add YearMonth to DateTime, Adjust Date, Adjust DateTime, Adjust Time, Current date. Current DateTime value, Current time, DateTime, Day from DAte, Day from DateTime, Equal Date, Equal DateTime, Equal Day, Equal Month, Equal MonthDay, Equal Time, Equal Year, Equal YearMonth, Greater Date, Greater DateTime, Greater Time, Hours from DateTime, Hours from Time, Less Date, Less DateTime, Less Time, Minutes from DateTime, Minutes from Time, Month from Date, Month from DateTime, Seconds from DateTime, Seconds from Time, Subtract Dates, Subtract DateTimes, Subtract DateTime from Date, Subtract DateTime from DateTime, Subtract DateTime from Time, Subtract Times, Subtract YearMonth from Date, Subtract YearMonth from DateTime, Time zone from Date, Time zone from DateTime, Time zone from Time, Year from Date, Year from DateTime. Logical comparisonUsed to perform a variety of logical operations, such as greater than and logical existence. Equal, Exists, Greater, Greater or equal, if, if else, Is date, Is DateTime, Is nil, Is null, Is number, Is string, Less, Less or equal, Logical AND, Logical NOT, Logical OR, Not equal MathematicalUsed to perform a variety of mathematical and scientific operations, such as addition and multiplication. Absolute, Add, Arctangent, Ceiling, Cosine, Divide, Exponential , Exponential (base 10), Floor, Integre divide, Log, Log (base 10), Modulo, Multiply, Power, Round, Sine, Square root, Subtract, Tangent String

Used to perform a variety of string functions, such as trimming and concatenation.

Codepoints to string, Concat, Contains, Ends with, Length, Lowercase, Name, Regular expression matches, Regular expression replace, Replace, Start with, String to codepoints, Substring, Substring after, Substring before, Trim, Trim left, Trim right, Uppercase Utility

Used to perform a variety of additional and distinct operations that don’t fit in the above Categories, such as stopping a transformation and returning the specified error code and description or format a number or a date.

Copy, Error, Format date, Format DateTime value, Format number, Format time
Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: String functions (video)

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: String functions (video)

In my last blog post, I explain in detail the String functions available in the new Data Mapper, and I endup documenting each of them.

String functions are used to manipulate strings in standard ways, such as conversions to all uppercase or all lowercase, string concatenation, determination of string length, white space trimming, etc. If you come from the BizTalk Server background or are migrating BizTalk Server projects, they are the equivalent of String Functoids inside BizTalk Mapper Editor.

The String functoids are:

  • Codepoints to string: Converts the specified codepoints value to a string and returns the result.
  • Concat: Combines two or more strings and returns the combined string.
  • Contains: Returns true or false based on whether the string input contains the specified substring.
  • Ends with: Returns true or false based on whether the string input ends with the specified substring.
  • Length: Returns the number of items in the specified string or array.
  • Lowercase: Returns a string in lowercase format.
  • Name: Returns the local name of the selector node, which is useful when you want to retrieve the name of the incoming message component, not the value.
  • Regular expression matches: Returns true or false based on whether the string input matches the specified regular expression.
  • Regular expression replace: Returns a string created from the string input by using a given regular expression to find and replace matching substrings with the specified string.
  • Replace: Replaces a substring with the specified string and return the new complete string.
  • Starts with: Returns true if the given string starts with the specified substring.
  • String to codepoints: Converts the specified string to codepoints.
  • Substring: Returns characters from the specified string, starting from the specified position.
  • Substring after: Returns the characters that follow the specified substring in the source string.
  • Substring before: Returns the characters that precede the specified substring in the source string.
  • Trim: Returns the specified string with all the leading and trailing white space characters removed.
  • Trim left: Returns the specified string with all the leading white space characters removed.
  • Trim right: Returns the specified string with all the trailing white space characters removed.
  • Uppercase: Returns a string in uppercase format.

In this video, we will see each of these String Functions in action. For each one, we will provide simple input data, and we will see what the expected output is.

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it useful and want to help me write more, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: String functions

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper: String functions

Overview

String functions are used to manipulate strings in standard ways, such as conversions to all uppercase or all lowercase, string concatenation, determination of string length, white space trimming, etc. If you come from the BizTalk Server background or are migrating BizTalk Server projects, they are the equivalent of String Functoids inside BizTalk Mapper Editor.

Available Functions

The String functoids are:

  • Codepoints to string: Converts the specified codepoints value to a string and returns the result.
  • Concat: Combines two or more strings and returns the combined string.
  • Contains: Returns true or false based on whether the string input contains the specified substring.
  • Ends with: Returns true or false based on whether the string input ends with the specified substring.
  • Length: Returns the number of items in the specified string or array.
  • Lowercase: Returns a string in lowercase format.
  • Name: Returns the local name of the selector node, which is useful when you want to retrieve the name of the incoming message component, not the value.
  • Regular expression matches: Returns true or false based on whether the string input matches the specified regular expression.
  • Regular expression replace: Returns a string created from the string input by using a given regular expression to find and replace matching substrings with the specified string.
  • Replace: Replaces a substring with the specified string and return the new complete string.
  • Starts with: Returns true if the given string starts with the specified substring.
  • String to codepoints: Converts the specified string to codepoints.
  • Substring: Returns characters from the specified string, starting from the specified position.
  • Substring after: Returns the characters that follow the specified substring in the source string.
  • Substring before: Returns the characters that precede the specified substring in the source string.
  • Trim: Returns the specified string with all the leading and trailing white space characters removed.
  • Trim left: Returns the specified string with all the leading white space characters removed.
  • Trim right: Returns the specified string with all the trailing white space characters removed.
  • Uppercase: Returns a string in uppercase format.

Codepoints to string

This function states that you can convert the specified codepoints value to a string and returns the result. but first, we need to understand what is a codepoint! In character encoding terminology, a code pointcodepoint, or code position is a numerical value that maps to a specific character. Code points usually represent a single grapheme, usually a letter, digit, punctuation mark, or whitespace but sometimes represent symbols, control characters, or formatting. You can check and learn more about codepoint here: https://codepoints.net/. For example, the codepoint 65 is the letter A.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: codepoints-to-string()

  • codepoints-to-string($arg as xs:string) as xs:string

Concat

This function states that you can combine two or more strings and returns the combined string.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: concat()

  • concat( $arg1 as xs:anyAtomicType?, $arg2 as xs:anyAtomicType?, … ) as xs:string

Rules:

  • This function accepts two or more xs:anyAtomicType arguments and casts each one to xs:string. The function returns the xs:string that is, the concatenation of the values of its arguments after conversion. If any argument is the empty sequence, that argument is treated as the zero-length string.
  • The concat function is specified to allow two or more arguments, which are concatenated together. This is the only function specified in this document that allows a variable number of arguments.

Contains

This function states that it returns true or false based on whether the string input (argument 1) contains the specified substring (argument 2).

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: contains()

  • contains($arg1 as xs:string?$arg2 as xs:string?) as xs:boolean

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg1 or $arg2 is the empty sequence or contains only ignorable collation units, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • If the value of $arg2 is the zero-length string, then the function returns true.
  • If the value of $arg1 is the zero-length string, the function returns false.

Ends with

This function states that it returns true or false based on whether the string input ends with the specified substring.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: ends-with()

  • ends-with($arg1 as xs:string?$arg2 as xs:string?) as xs:boolean

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg1 or $arg2 is the empty sequence or contains only ignorable collation units, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • If the value of $arg2 is the zero-length string, then the function returns true.
  • If the value of $arg1 is the zero-length string, and the value of $arg2 is not the zero-length string, then the function returns false.
  • The function returns an xs:boolean indicating whether or not the value of $arg1 ends with a sequence of collation units that provides a match to the collation units of $arg2 according to the collation that is used.

Length

This function states that it returns the number of items in the specified string or array.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: string-lenght()

  • string-length($arg as xs:string?) as xs:integer

Rules:

  • The function returns an xs:integer equal to the length in characters of the value of $arg.
  • If the value of $arg is the empty sequence, the function returns the xs:integer value zero (0).

Lowercase

This function states that it returns a string in lowercase format.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: lower-case()

  • lower-case($arg as xs:string?) as xs:string

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg is the empty sequence, the zero-length string is returned.
  • Otherwise, the function returns the value of $arg after translating every character to its lower-case correspondent as defined in the appropriate case mappings section in the Unicode standard.

Name

This function states that it returns the local name of the selector node, which is useful when you want to retrieve the name of the incoming message component, not the value.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: local-name-from-QName()

  • local-name-from-QName($arg as xs:QName?) as xs:NCName

Rules:

  • If $arg is the empty sequence, the function returns the empty sequence.
  • Otherwise, the function returns a xs:NCName representing the local part of $arg.

Regular expression matches

This function states that it returns true or false based on whether the string input matches the specified regular expression.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: matches()

  • matches($input as xs:string?$pattern as xs:string) as xs:boolean

Rules:

  • If $input is the empty sequence, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • The function returns true if $input or some substring of $input matches the regular expression supplied as $pattern. Otherwise, the function returns false

Regular expression replace

This function states that it returns a string created from the string input by using a given regular expression to find and replace matching substrings with the specified string.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: replace()

  • replace($input as xs:string?, $pattern as xs:string, $replacement as xs:string) as xs:string

Rules:

  • If $input is the empty sequence, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • The function returns the xs:string that is obtained by replacing each non-overlapping substring of $input that matches the given $pattern with an occurrence of the $replacement string.
  • If two overlapping substrings of $input both match the $pattern, then only the first one (that is, the one whose first character comes first in the $input string) is replaced.

In this sample above, if the city element from the source message has the value abracadabra then the output will be *c*bra

Replace

This function states that it replaces a substring with the specified string and returns the new complete string.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: replace()

  • replace($input as xs:string?, $pattern as xs:string, $replacement as xs:string) as xs:string

This will be exactly the same as the previous one, but instead of using a regular expression pattern, we use a string to be replaced.

Starts with

This function states that it returns true if the given string starts with the specified substring.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: starts-with()

  • starts-with($arg1 as xs:string?$arg2 as xs:string?) as xs:boolean

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg1 or $arg2 is the empty sequence, or contains only ignorable collation units, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • If the value of $arg2 is the zero-length string, then the function returns true. If the value of $arg1 is the zero-length string, and the value of $arg2 is not the zero-length string, then the function returns false.

String to codepoints

This function states that it converts the specified string to codepoints. But first, we need to understand what is a codepoint! In character encoding terminology, a code pointcodepoint, or code position is a numerical value that maps to a specific character. Code points usually represent a single grapheme, usually a letter, digit, punctuation mark, or whitespace but sometimes represent symbols, control characters, or formatting. You can check and learn more about codepoint here: https://codepoints.net/. For example, the letter A is the codepoint 65.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: string-to-codepoints()

  • fn:string-to-codepoints($arg as xs:string?) as xs:integer

Rules:

  • The function returns a sequence of integers, each integer being the Unicode codepoint of the corresponding character in $arg.
  • If $arg is a zero-length string or the empty sequence, the function returns the empty sequence.

Substring

This function states that it returns characters from the specified string, starting from the specified position.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: substring()

  • substring($sourceString as xs:string?, $start as xs:double, $length as xs:double) as xs:string

or

  • substring($sourceString as xs:string?, $start as xs:double) as xs:string

Rules:

  • If the value of $sourceString is the empty sequence, the function returns the zero-length string.
  • Otherwise, the function returns a string comprising those characters of $sourceString whose index position (counting from one) is greater than or equal to the value of $start (rounded to an integer), and (if $length is specified) less than the sum of $start and $length (both rounded to integers).
  • The characters returned do not extend beyond $sourceString. If $start is zero or negative, only those characters in positions greater than zero are returned.

Substring after

This function states that it returns the characters that follow the specified substring in the source string.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: substring-after()

  • substring-after($arg1 as xs:string?$arg2 as xs:string?) as xs:string

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg1 or $arg2 is the empty sequence or contains only ignorable collation units, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • If the value of $arg2 is the zero-length string, then the function returns the value of $arg1.
  • If the value of $arg1 does not contain a string that is equal to the value of $arg2, then the function returns the zero-length string.

Substring before

This function states that it returns the characters that precede the specified substring in the source string.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: substring-before()

  • substring-before($arg1 as xs:string?$arg2 as xs:string?) as xs:string

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg1 or $arg2 is the empty sequence or contains only ignorable collation units, it is interpreted as the zero-length string.
  • If the value of $arg2 is the zero-length string, then the function returns the zero-length string.
  • If the value of $arg1 does not contain a string that is equal to the value of $arg2, then the function returns the zero-length string.

Trim

This function states that it returns the specified string with all the leading and trailing white space characters removed.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: replace()

  • replace($input as xs:string?, ‘^s*|s*$’, ”)

This is a specific call to the replace() function where the second and third arguments are already specified behind the scenes. Trim functoid is an abstraction of this replace() function call.

Trim left

This function states that it returns the specified string with all the leading white space characters removed.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: replace()

  • replace($input as xs:string?, ‘^s+’, ”)

This is a specific call to the replace() function where the second and third arguments are already specified behind the scenes. Trim functoid is an abstraction of this replace() function call.

Trim right

This function states that it returns the specified string with all the trailing white space characters removed.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: replace()

  • replace($input as xs:string?, ‘s+$’, ”)

This is a specific call to the replace() function where the second and third arguments are already specified behind the scenes. Trim functoid is an abstraction of this replace() function call.

Uppercase

This function states that it returns a string in uppercase format.

Behind the scenes, this function is translated to the following XPath function: upper-case()

  • upper-case($arg as xs:string?) as xs:string

Rules:

  • If the value of $arg is the empty sequence, the zero-length string is returned.
  • Otherwise, the function returns the value of $arg after translating every character to its upper-case correspondent as defined in the appropriate case mappings section in the Unicode standard.

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it useful and want to help me write more, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper Patterns: Aggregation Pattern

Logic Apps (Standard) Data Mapper Patterns: Aggregation Pattern

Basically, the Aggregation Pattern could also be another example or a subset of the Content Enricher Pattern (you can know more about this here: BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices), but sometimes when we exchange messages between different systems, we will need to gather information from multiple external sources, this is also known as Scatter-Gather Pattern (https://www.enterpriseintegrationpatterns.com/patterns/messaging/BroadcastAggregate.html), and once a complete set of messages has been received, we need to process them as a whole and combine or merge parts of information from each correlated message to create the expected message by the target system.

So the main difference between the Aggregation Pattern and the Content Enricher one is that in this last one, we’re normally talking about mapping one-to-one messages, and in the Aggregator pattern, we are dealing with multiple inbound messages that were collected from the original request and need to be mapped and aggregated into a single outbound request. For example, we want to bill the client’s order after all items have been pulled from the financial system or warehouse. Also, Content Enricher can happen inside the Aggregation Pattern along with other types of patterns.

Reference to this pattern:

In this video, you can see and learn how to apply the Aggregation Pattern inside the new Data Mapper available for Logic Apps (Standard)

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it useful and want to help me write more, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira

Logic App Standard error calling Transform using Data Mapper XSLT action: undefined. undefined

Logic App Standard error calling Transform using Data Mapper XSLT action: undefined. undefined

I have been testing Data Mapper for almost maybe 4 months since the first private previews. Still, I have usually tried the Data Mapper capabilities and not the interaction between Logic Apps Standard workflow and the Data Mapper. Now that I’m preparing and finalizing my session for the Azure Logic Apps Community Day 2023, I’m finding these little headaches in trying to put these pieces working together. You also need to be aware that this behavior and experience may change in the future since DaTa Mapper is still in preview.

So, while I was trying to call a transformation created by the new Data Mapper, in this case, a JSON to JSON transformation, running locally in my machine, I was always getting this really annoying and non-sense error since it doesn’t provide any real and valuable help or insight on the issue we are facing:

  • undefined. undefined

Sometimes I think the Microsoft developer team likes that I write all these Errors and Warnings, Causes and Solutions blog posts, or they are just teasing us.

I was surprised to see this error since I just finished developing my map, and I had successfully tested it on the Data Mapper editor.

Cause

The reason for this error to happen is that I forgot to read the prerequisites for this preview extension which are well explained here: Announcement: Azure Logic Apps’ New Data Mapper for Visual Studio Code (Preview).

And that you can see in action in this video of Kent Weare:

Solution

For the map to run successfully in runtime, within your local.settings.json file in your logic apps standard project, ensure you have the following property configuration:

  • FUNCTIONS_WORKER_RUNTIME property set to dotnet-isolated.
  • And add the AzureWebJobsFeatureFlags property with the value: EnableMultiLanguageWorker

As you can see in the sample below:

{
  "IsEncrypted": false,
  "Values": {
    "AzureWebJobsStorage": "UseDevelopmentStorage=true",
    "FUNCTIONS_WORKER_RUNTIME": "dotnet-isolated",
    "AzureWebJobsFeatureFlags": "EnableMultiLanguageWorker",
    "WORKFLOWS_SUBSCRIPTION_ID": ""
  }
}

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it helpful and want to help me write more content, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira

Join me at Azure Logic Apps Community Day 2023 | June 22, 2023 | A walk in the park with the new Logic App Data Mapper

Join me at Azure Logic Apps Community Day 2023 | June 22, 2023 | A walk in the park with the new Logic App Data Mapper

With INTEGRATE 2023 London concluded, time to shift gears to the next big event on cloud integration: Azure Logic Apps Community Day 2023, sometimes called LogicAppsAviators Community Day, which will take place on Thursday, June 22nd at 9 AM (Pacific) or 5 PM (UTC). The event is free and will be streamed on YouTube/Twitch, so be sure to subscribe to the Azure Developers YouTube to stay up to date.

Azure Logic Apps Community Day 2023 will be the must-attend event for anyone who wants to learn more about Logic Apps and how it can help to solve real-life integration problems. It will be a full day of learning from the basics of getting started to deep dives into advanced automation with Logic Apps presented by the Logic Apps product group, Microsoft MVPs, and expert community members. In the end, will be a Round Table Discussion – Ask Me Anything with the Product Group and Community – this will be your opportunity to make “hard” questions.

I will have the pleasure of delivering a session about the new Data Mapper at this event and also be part of the panel on the Round Table Discussion!

About my session

Session Name: A walk in the park with the new Logic App Data Mapper

Abstract: In this session, we will present the new Data Mapper experience for Logic Apps Standard and how we can apply XML to XML transformations or XML to JSON transformations using a visual designer. Here, we will also address how to implement well-known mapping patterns like direct translation, Data translation, content enricher, or aggregator patterns alongside many others.

See the full agenda here: Azure Logic Apps Community Day 2023

Hope you find this helpful! So, if you liked the content or found it helpful and want to help me write more content, you can buy (or help buy) my son a Star Wars Lego! 

Author: Sandro Pereira

Sandro Pereira lives in Portugal and works as a consultant at DevScope. In the past years, he has been working on implementing Integration scenarios both on-premises and cloud for various clients, each with different scenarios from a technical point of view, size, and criticality, using Microsoft Azure, Microsoft BizTalk Server and different technologies like AS2, EDI, RosettaNet, SAP, TIBCO etc.

He is a regular blogger, international speaker, and technical reviewer of several BizTalk books all focused on Integration. He is also the author of the book “BizTalk Mapping Patterns & Best Practices”. He has been awarded MVP since 2011 for his contributions to the integration community.
View all posts by Sandro Pereira