This post was originally published here

In my first article recapping the BizTalk Summit 2015, I said I would revisit the topic of triggers for those of you wanting to build out custom API Apps that implemented either of those patterns.

After working through the official docs, and reviewing the code presented at the BizTalk Summit 2015 in anticipation of our upcoming Cloud-Based Integration Using Azure App Service class, I decided to take a little bit of a different direction.

Rather than do a write-up both here, and in hands-on-lab form within the class of writing a bunch of custom Swashbuckle operation filters for generating the appropriate metadata for a Logic App to properly consume an API App that’s trying to be a trigger, I decided to write up a library that just made it a little bit easier to create custom API Apps that are consumable from the Logic App designer.

How did I go about doing that? Well Sameer Chabungbam had mentioned in his presentation that a more elegant solution might be to use attributes for friendly names and the like. So I went in that direction, and made attributes for all of the stuff that the Logic App designer needs to have in a certain way (really anything that involved vendor extensions in the generated swagger). What do we do with all of those attributes? Well, we uh, read them in custom operation / schema filters of course! So yes, I did have to write some custom filters after all, but now you don’t have to!

Announcing QuickLearn’s T-Rex Metadata Library

PackageIconI rolled all of the code into a library that I’ve named the T-Rex Metadata Library1. The library is available as a NuGet package as well that you can add directly to your API App projects within Visual Studio 2013.

So how can we use that to make custom triggers? I’m glad you asked. Let’s get right into it.

Creating Custom Polling Triggers

The easiest kind of trigger to implement is a polling trigger. A polling trigger is polled by a Logic App at a set polling interval, and is asked for data. When the trigger has data available, it is supposed to return a 200 OK status with the data contained in the response body. When there is not data available, a 202 Accepted status should be returned with an empty response body.

You can find an example of a polling trigger over here. This polling trigger takes in a single configuration parameter named “divisor” and when polled will return data if and only if the current minute is evenly divisible by the divisor specified (kind of silly, I know).

So, how do I separate sample from reality and actually build one?

Steps for Creating a Polling Trigger

  1. Create a new project in Visual Studio using the Web Application template
  2. Choose API App (Preview) as the type of Web Application you are creating
  3. Add the TRex NuGet package to your project
  4. In the SwaggerConfig.cs file, add a using directive for TRex.Metadata
  5. In the SwaggerConfig.cs file, just after the line showing how to use the  c.SingleApiVersion add a line that reads c.ReleaseTheTRex();
  6. Add using directives for the Microsoft.Azure.AppService.ApiApps.Service, and TRex.Metadata namespaces.
    • Microsoft.Azure.AppService.ApiApps.Service provides the EventWaitPoll andEventTriggered extension methods
    • TRex.Metadata provides the T-Rex Metadata attribute, and the Trigger attribute
  7. Create an action that returns an HttpResponseMessage
  8. Decorate the action with the HttpGet attribute
  9. Decorate the action with the Metadata attribute and provide a friendly name, and description, for your polling action
  10. Decorate the action with the Trigger attribute passing the argument TriggerType.Poll to the constructor, as well as the type of model that will be sent when data is available (e.g.,typeof(MyModelClassHere))
  11. Make sure the action has a string parameter named triggerState
    • This is a value that you can populate and pass back whenever polling data is returned to the Logic App, and the Logic App will send it back to you on the next poll (e.g., to let you know that it is finished with the last item sent)
    • You do not need to decorate this parameter with any attributes. T-Rex looks for this property by name and automatically applies the correct metadata (friendly name, description, visibility, and default value)
  12. Optionally, add any other parameters that controls how it should poll (e.g., file name mask, warning temperature, target heart rate, etc…)
    • Decorate these parameters with the Metadata attribute to control their friendly names, descriptions, and visibility settings
  13. Make sure that the action returns the value generated by calling Request.EventWaitPoll when no data is available
    • You can also provide a hint to the Logic App as to a proper polling interval for the next request (if you anticipate data available at a certain time)
    • You can also provide a triggerState value that you want the Logic App to send to you on the next poll
  14. Make sure that the action returns the value generated by calling Request.EventTriggered when data is available
    • The first argument should be the data to be returned to the Logic App, followed by the newtriggerState value that you want to receive on the next poll, and optionally a new polling interval for the next request (if you anticipate data available at a certain time, or more likely that you know more data is immediately available and there isn’t a need to wait).

After you publish your API App, you should be able to use it as a trigger in a Logic App. Here’s what the sample looks like after being deployed:

Polling Trigger Sample

Next Up

In my next post, I’ll turn my focus to custom push triggers. For now though, I need to rest a little bit to get ready for 2 days of teaching followed immediately by Build 2015! It’s going to a long, yet quite fun week this week!

Until next week, take care!

1It was named this so that it would comply with the latest trends of fanciful library names, and so that I could justify naming a method ReleaseTheTRex. If you believe the name too unprofessional, let me know and I may add a TRex.Enterprise.Extensions namespace that includes a more professional sounding method name which simply calls into the former.